• October 23, 2015    |   First Amendment

    The Potato Man lives, but he almost got mashed. The cheerful, anthropomorphic mascot of the Potato House restaurant had been threatened by the Downtown Revitalization Board of Sulphur Springs, Texas. His smiling mug didn’t fit their image of the downtown. But after locals rallied to his defense, the city relented and allowed him to stay.…

  • September 18, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    In a bold move last Tuesday evening after just one hour of discussion, Sarasota City Commissioners voted unanimously to deregulate all for-hire vehicle services in the city, removing the barriers that taxi drivers complained gave ridesharing services like Uber an unfair advantage. Now all drivers, including taxi cabbies, can conduct their business without government interference. The…

  • September 18, 2015    |   Private Property

    A team of investors led by soccer player David Beckham may be granted permission to construct a newmajor league soccer stadium in Miami, regardless of the human toll. Before the construction of the soccer stadium begins, the city of Miami will have to acquire acres of land in the middle of Miami. To get the…

  • August 20, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    Regulatory busybodies in Longmont, Colo., want to destroy Raymond “Rich” Smith’s windshield chip repair business. Why? City officials can’t decide. For years, Rich has managed the operations of Longmont’s Countrywood Inn & RV Park. As a side job, he repairs chipped windshields from a van parked at the inn, which a police officer gave Rich…

  • August 20, 2015    |   Private Property

    Property owners who have had their cash seized by police in Wyoming face a low chance of ever recovering their money. Since 2010, police have seized nearly $1.3 million in cash, but returned a mere $190,000 to owners, according to new data provided by the Wyoming Joint Judiciary Committee. In other words, less than 15…

  • August 20, 2015    |   Private Property

    When it comes to warrantless searches, the Fourth Amendment is making a comeback. Last month, privacy rights activists claimed victory in the landmark Supreme Court decision City of Los Angeles v. Patel. Thanks in part to the advocacy of IJ and other organizations, the Court ruled 5-4 that a city ordinance requiring hotel owners to…

  • August 17, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    After three years of debate, Florida’s craft beer aficionados will finally be able to purchase their favorite brews in common, refillable, half-gallon jugs called “growlers.” And Florida brewers are ecstatic about the long-overdue change. Luis Brignoni, owner of Miami’s Wynwood Brewing Company, sees benefits for his customers in the new size, “It’s the industry standard,…

  • August 7, 2015    |   Private Property

    Hinga Mbogo immigrated to Dallas from Kenya to live the American dream—but Dallas officials had other plans for him. City officials are demanding that Hinga stop repairing cars at his popular shop, Hinga’s Automotive Company, because it doesn’t fit in with their plans to reimagine the up-and-coming neighborhood. The city barred Hinga from using his land…

  • August 6, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    Thanks to entrepreneurial successes like Uber, Lyft, Sidecar, and (if you’re in Boston) Bridj, most people think of ridesharing apps when they hear about changes in transportation innovation. But two of the Institute for Justice’s most recent economic liberty cases show exciting things are happening in the industry beyond ridesharing. John Rinaldi is a serial…

  • July 28, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    Under Minnesota’s cottage food laws, enterprising bakers can legally sell a wide variety of “not potentially hazardous food” made at home, like certain baked goods, jams, jellies and home-canned pickles, fruits and vegetables. While nearly every state now has a cottage food law on the books, until recently, Minnesota’s was one of the most stringent.…

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