Dela Ends

Dela Ends owns and runs a small, USDA-certified organic farm, called Scotch Hill Farm, with her husband and children in Green County. Dela and her family are passionate about sustainable agriculture. For instance, Dela and her husband volunteer in Africa teaching sustainable farming practices to women, and their farm offers community-supported-agriculture (“CSA”) subscriptions so that members of the community can receive monthly produce deliveries. Another way that Dela practices sustainable agriculture is by baking breads and other baked goods with grains from her farm.

Selling her home-baked goods would let Dela help support her family, which has become more challenging in recent years. Demand for Scotch Hill’s organic crops has suffered since the recession, and as Dela gets older, it is more difficult for her to work the fields; she recently had a double-knee replacement and wants to contribute to her family’s income in a way that is less physically taxing.

Selling baked goods would be the perfect solution—if only it were legal. Dela used to frequently sell her baked goods at farmers’ markets and would often sell out. But Dela stopped when she learned about the ban. Dela also wishes to include her home-baked goods in the monthly produce boxes for her CSA subscribers. This would be especially helpful in the months in which it is harder to fill boxes, as well as at times when particular crops are not doing well.

  • January 13, 2016    |   Economic Liberty

    Wisconsin Baked Good Ban

    Wisconsin Farmers Challenge State Ban on Selling Home-Baked Goods

    Anyone with an oven and a recipe should be able to have a baking business—but that is not the case in Wisconsin, where selling baked goods made in your home kitchen is punishable by up to $1,000 in fines or six months in jail. Wisconsin is one of only two states (the other being New…

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