Press Releases

  • June 1, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Victory for Wisconsin Home Bakers

    Judge Strikes Down Ban on Selling Home-Baked Goods as Unconstitutional

    Madison—Wisconsin became a little freer, and a lot more delicious, after a Lafayette Circuit Court judge struck down the state’s ban on selling home-baked goods as unconstitutional. Wisconsin was one of only two states to ban entrepreneurs like Lisa Kivirist, Kriss Marion and Dela Ends from selling cookies, cakes, muffins and breads simply because they…

  • May 31, 2017    |   First Amendment

    Temporary Reprieve: Oregon Allows Traffic Light Talk While Lawsuit Proceeds

    Federal judge issues order allowing Mats Järlström to discuss traffic light timing while his lawsuit proceeds through the courts

    Arlington, Va.—In an early and important win, yesterday a federal judge issued an order prohibiting Oregon from penalizing Mats Järlström for discussing the timing of stop lights or for calling himself an engineer. The order, which was agreed to by the state, means that Järlström is free to exercise his First Amendment rights to discuss…

  • May 26, 2017    |   School Choice

    Victory for School Choice in Montana

    Parents Successfully Challenge Montana Department of Revenue’s Rule Excluding Religious Schools from Tax-Credit Scholarship Program

    “There are so many families who have never hoped to be able to afford private school for their children. This decision is a game changer for them.”

  • May 23, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Today, the Rhode Island House of Representatives voted unanimously to eliminate the state’s expensive, unnecessary and time-consuming licensing requirement for African-style natural hair braiders. Under Rhode Island law, braiders can only work if they first obtain a cosmetology license, which takes at least 1,500 hours of training. Only six states have stricter requirements. But if…

  • May 18, 2017    |   Private Property

    Between 2009 and 2013, local and state law enforcement carried out 3,750 civil forfeiture cases—more than three-quarters of all forfeiture cases.

  • May 17, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Arkansas Entrepreneur Breaks Taxi Monopoly

    Ken’s Cab is Little Rock’s First New Taxi Service in 16 years

    Little Rock, Ark.—Today is a historic day for transportation freedom in Little Rock. Entrepreneur Ken Leininger has opened up the city’s first taxi company in 16 years after a successful year-long legal battle with Little Rock officials. The Little Rock Board of Directors granted Ken’s request for seven new taxi permits yesterday. This morning, Ken…

  • May 11, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Today, the Louisiana House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved two bills that would repeal the state’s expensive, unnecessary and time-consuming license for African-style natural hair braiders. In Louisiana, braiders can only work if they first obtain a specialty license in “alternative hair design,” which takes at least 500 hours of training. Yet no schools currently offer…

  • May 11, 2017    |   Private Property

    Colorado Poised to Become National Leader in Forfeiture Transparency

    Bill Sent to Governor Would Also Close Lucrative Loophole

    Late yesterday, the Colorado General Assembly approved HB 17-1313, a bill that would bolster transparency for civil forfeiture and close a federal loophole that has generated millions in forfeiture revenue for law enforcement. Under civil forfeiture, law enforcement agencies can seize and then take title to cash, cars and other valuables without charging anyone with—let…

  • May 9, 2017    |   Private Property

    Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad has signed SF 446, a bill designed to reform Iowa’s civil forfeiture laws by requiring, in most cases, a criminal conviction before police can permanently confiscate property. Unlike criminal forfeiture, civil forfeiture typically allows the government to permanently keep property without charging anyone with a crime. “Iowa has some of the…

  • May 8, 2017    |   Private Property

    San Diego—After a 15-month court battle, the Slatic family finally received good news late on Friday afternoon when Judge Tamila E. Ipema of the San Diego County Superior Court ordered the local District Attorney to return their life savings, after it was seized for civil forfeiture. The Judge ruled that the District Attorney had no…

  • May 3, 2017    |   Private Property

    Today, the Colorado House of Representatives approved HB 17-1313, a bill that would bolster transparency for civil forfeiture and close a federal loophole that has generated millions in forfeiture revenue for law enforcement. Under civil forfeiture, law enforcement agencies can seize and then take title to cash, cars and other valuables without charging anyone with—let…

  • April 28, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb has signed a bill that exempts natural or African-style hair braiding from the state’s cosmetology laws. Authored by Rep. Timothy Wesco and Sen. Liz Brown, HB 1243 passed by wide margins in the Indiana General Assembly. “Indiana has long prided itself as ‘a state that works,’” said Institute for Justice Senior Legislative Counsel…

  • April 26, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Today, the Florida House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly in favor of HB 7047, which eliminates or eases many burdensome occupational licenses. “Occupational licensing is one of the biggest barriers stopping Floridians from finding work,” said Justin Pearson, managing attorney of the Institute for Justice Florida Office. “Today’s vote is a welcome first step to paring…

  • April 25, 2017    |   First Amendment

    Lawsuit Challenges Oregon Law Prohibiting Mathematical Criticism Without a License

    After Mats Järlström’s wife got a red-light camera ticket, Oregon fined him $500 for questioning its traffic light timing

    Portland, Or.—If Galileo or da Vinci, the famed Italian polymaths, lived in modern day Oregon, they might well be the targets of a lengthy and expensive inquisition by the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying for the unlicensed practice of engineering for engaging in mathematical criticism. That is because neither became…

  • April 24, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Final Victory for Ridesharing Drivers in Chicago

    U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Hear Appeal in Case Seeking to Preserve Cab Companies’ Longstanding Monopoly Power

    Washington, D.C.—Today, the United States Supreme Court declined to hear taxi companies’ appeal of a groundbreaking decision issued last October by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court’s decision not to hear the case finalizes an important victory for transportation freedom all across the country and solidifies the ability of cities to sweep…

  • April 21, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Today, the Indiana House of Representatives and the Indiana Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill to deregulate the practice of natural or African-style hair braiding. Authored by Rep. Timothy Wesco, HB 1243 now heads to Gov. Eric Holcomb for signature. Currently, braiders can only work if they first obtain a cosmetology license, which takes at least 1,500 hours…

  • April 20, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Government’s Business-as-Usual Attitude Helps Bottleneckers, Hurts Entrepreneurs & Costs Consumers

    Bottleneckers are found in literally every state, as documented by the Institute for Justice

    Arlington, Virginia—Pop quiz:  What is the proper role of government? Is your answer:  To protect politically powerful special interests from competition? No? Unfortunately, too many lawmakers and special interests see protectionism as a proper use of government force. Examples abound: There are the recent actions taken by lawmakers and the hotel industry against Airbnb. And…

  • April 20, 2017    |   Economic Liberty

    Today, the New Hampshire Senate approved a bill to deregulate the practice of natural or African-style hair braiding. Under New Hampshire law, braiders can only work if they first obtain a cosmetology license, which takes at least 1,500 hours of training. Only six states have stricter requirements. But if enacted, HB 82 will exempt braiding from…

  • April 19, 2017    |   Private Property

    Supreme Court Upholds Principle Of “Innocent Until Proven Guilty”

    Today’s Decision In Nelson v. Colorado Will Have Important Implications for Civil Forfeiture Laws.

    This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 7-1 decision in Nelson v. Colorado, striking down a Colorado law that forced people to go to court to affirmatively prove their own innocence in order to recover funds paid as a result of a criminal conviction, after the conviction was reversed on appeal. The Court found…

  • April 18, 2017    |   Private Property

    With Lawsuit Pending, Charlestown Extends Illegal Inspections to Homeowners

    Mayor Hall Flip-flops on Homeowner Property Rights in Pleasant Ridge

    Last night, the Charlestown City Council passed a resolution that announced it would be extending the city’s illegal code enforcement regime to homeowners in the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood. Prior to last night’s vote, the illegal inspections only targeted rental properties. For the last four months, Charlestown Mayor Bob Hall has defended the city’s illegal land…


Media Team

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