Hawaii

 

Grades
Forfeiture
Law Grade
State Law Evasion Grade  Final
Grade
Hawaii

 

Forfeiture Law
Hawaii’s civil asset forfeiture laws are in need of serious reform.  The state may forfeit your property by showing by a preponderance of the evidence that the property was used in a crime.  Unfortunately, if you are an innocent owner and believe your property was wrongly seized, you bear the burden of proof.  Law enforcement has a strong incentive to seize property, as they receive 100 percent of the funds raised through civil forfeiture. 

Forfeitures as Reported to LEMAS (Drug-related only)

Total Assets
Forfeited

Assets Forfeited per
Law Enforcement Agency

1993

$4,091,284

$1,007,199

1997

$1,616,491

$236,675

2000

$2,067,879

$515,824

2003

$2,557,282

$618,159

 

Equitable Sharing Proceeds from the Assets Forfeiture Fund (AFF)

Proceeds Returned to State

FY 2000

$1,207,271

FY 2001

$607,098

FY 2002

$2,052,050

FY 2003

$2,038,594

FY 2004

$1,802,294

FY 2005

$1,657,680

FY 2006

$3,345,770

FY 2007

$2,808,610

FY 2008

$1,626,211

Total

$17,145,578

Average per Year

$1,905,064

 

Freedom of Information Data
Reports of forfeitures by seizing agency

Currency

Vehicles

Other

Total

2001

$450,945

$536,040

$207,033

$1,194,018

2002

$645,537

$487,147

$876,188

$2,008,872

2003

$1,044,944

$575,675

$286,000

$1,906,619

2004

$737,668

$457,792

$461,625

$1,657,085

2005

$414,395

$332,230

$316,627

$1,063,252

2006

$698,035

$460,855

$334,709

$1,493,599

2007

$636,598

$468,290

$300,396

$1,405,284

Total

$4,628,122

$3,318,029

$2,252,578

$10,728,729

Average per Year

$661,160

$474,004

$397,511

$1,532,676

 

Learn how states were graded and how data was collected

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