Little Pink House is a dramatic, touching and true film about one woman’s fight to save her home and another woman’s effort to take it to advance her political ambitions-a conflict that ultimately led all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Susette Kelo fights to save the only home she ever owned and to keep herself together as her world around her falls apart. Her legal case-litigated in the court of law and in the court of public opinion by the Institute for Justice-sparked a nationwide backlash against eminent domain abuse . . . the government’s use of eminent domain to take one person’s land only to give it over to another private party for their private use.

Follow our links to see where you can watch Little Pink House, and learn more about what YOU can do to help end eminent domain abuse once and for all.

Two-time Oscar nominee Catherine Keener played Institute for Justice client Susette Kelo in the original feature film, Little Pink House.

Take the Quiz

From 1998 through 2002, how many times did the government use or threaten eminent domain for private gain?

Learn More about Susette Kelo and Eminent Domain

Learn the Basics about Eminent Domain

Susette Kelo's Story Told through the Media

60 Minutes Reports on Eminent Domain Abuse

Eminent Domain Abuse: From a Neighborhood to Barren Fields

Aerial photographs of New London, Connecticut’s Fort Trumbull Neighborhood, which was the home of Susette Kelo and her neighbors. What was once a vibrant working-class neighborhood was bulldozed by the government for a development project that—well-over a decade after the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2005 ruling against the homeowners—is still a barren field home only to weeds and feral cats.

New London

1991

2016

Institute for Justice

The Institute for Justice is the national law firm for liberty. IJ defended the homes of Susette Kelo and her neighbors, and continues to fight today to end eminent domain abuse nationwide.

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