fbpx

Summer Joy Peterson

Summer Joy is a mother of three children. She owns and operates her family’s fourth‑generation ranch and farm, where she raises livestock and chickens. After the Act passed in 2017, Summer Joy began selling home-baked goods, eggs, and low‑acid canned vegetables from her ranch and at farmers markets.

Like Lydia’s community, Summer Joy’s rural community has struggled to find basic food staples during the COVID-19 pandemic. Like Lydia, Summer Joy has adjusted her business to address these needs and has sold eggs via contact-less pick up at her home to neighbors who reach out to her offering to purchase them.

If it were not for the Department’s rules, Summer Joy would also start selling additional homemade foods made with fresh ingredients from her ranch and farm, including cooked chicken meals, chicken noodle soup, vegetarian soups, and low-acid canned mustard corn relish. Despite having lawfully sold homemade foods foe years under the Act, the Department has banned her from expanding her homemade food sales to support her family and meet the needs of her community.

  • March 27, 2020    |   Economic Liberty

    The Legislature gave North Dakotans the freedom to buy and sell homemade foods and meals to their community when it passed the Cottage Food Act in 2017. For three years, North Dakotans sold delicious homemade foods to their friends and neighbors, creating hundreds of jobs. But in January 2020, a state agency—the Department of Health—illegally…

JOIN THE FIGHT!   Sign up for newsletters:

JOIN THE FIGHT!