Sometimes when the government does bad things to you it violates the Constitution. And sometimes it just violates the contract. Jeff Rowes explains the difference, and how things went down with a development scheme in the Fifth Circuit. Also, Will Aronin brings his expertise he learned as a trial lawyer to examine some junk science that has now been put on trial. Plus he details why it would be nice for a criminal defendant to know if a witness testifying against him is known to “stretch the truth.”

Preston Hollow Capital, LLC v. Cottonwood Development Corp., https://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions/pub/21/21-50389-CV0.pdf

O’Donnell v. Yezzo, https://www.opn.ca6.uscourts.gov/opinions.pdf/22a0026n-06.pdf

Judge Jon Newman article on “En Banc,” https://static.reuters.com/resources/media/editorial/20200714/IN%20BANC%20PRACTICE%20IN%20THE%20SECOND%20CIRCUIT%20THE%20VIRTUES%20OF%20RESTRAINT.pdf

Jeff Rowes, https://ij.org/staff/jrowes/

Will Aronin, https://ij.org/staff/will-aronin/

Anthony Sanders, https://ij.org/staff/asanders/

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