Following in the footsteps of last week’s Super Bowl halftime show, we’re keeping it West Coast today. Two cases from the Ninth Circuit that are Very Ninth Circuit. First, Bob McNamara explains how the overbreadth doctrine invalidated a restriction on speech related to violating immigration law. Then, Joe Gay describes the many ways the court found an Oakland, California ordinance to be just fine constitutionally even though it forces people to pay a lot of money just to move back into their house. Nobody raps, but there are unintentional references to the Norwegian pop group a-ha.

United States v. Hansen, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/02/10/17-10548.pdf

Ballinger v. City of Oakland, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/02/01/19-16550.pdf

Robert McNamara, https://ij.org/staff/robert-mcnamara/

Joe Gay, https://ij.org/staff/joe-gay/

Anthony Sanders, https://ij.org/staff/asanders/

Recent Episodes

Short Circuit 333 | Live at Hogan Lovells!

We join forces with the law firm of Hogan Lovells to bring you some “legal mumbo jumbo”—an episode recorded at their offices in Washington, D.C. […]

Listen Now

Short Circuit 331 | The British Are Coming

The Fourth of July holds a central place in American history. The day patriots threw off the shackles of King George. Which is why it’s […]

Listen Now

Short Circuit 330 | Pretext Takings

Everybody knows that the government can’t take property from you just because it doesn’t like you. But what if the government says it actually wants […]

Listen Now