Following in the footsteps of last week’s Super Bowl halftime show, we’re keeping it West Coast today. Two cases from the Ninth Circuit that are Very Ninth Circuit. First, Bob McNamara explains how the overbreadth doctrine invalidated a restriction on speech related to violating immigration law. Then, Joe Gay describes the many ways the court found an Oakland, California ordinance to be just fine constitutionally even though it forces people to pay a lot of money just to move back into their house. Nobody raps, but there are unintentional references to the Norwegian pop group a-ha.

United States v. Hansen, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/02/10/17-10548.pdf

Ballinger v. City of Oakland, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/02/01/19-16550.pdf

Robert McNamara, https://ij.org/staff/robert-mcnamara/

Joe Gay, https://ij.org/staff/joe-gay/

Anthony Sanders, https://ij.org/staff/asanders/

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