• Marian R. Williams, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
  • Jefferson H. Holcomb, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
  • Tomislav V. Kovandzic, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Criminology, University of Texas
  • Scott Bullock
    Senior Attorney, Institute for Justice

Civil forfeiture laws represent one of the most serious assaults on private property rights in the nation today. Under civil forfeiture, police and prosecutors can seize your car or other property, sell it and use the proceeds to fund agency budgets—all without so much as charging you with a crime. Unlike criminal forfeiture, where property is taken after its owner has been found guilty in a court of law, with civil forfeiture, owners need not be charged with or convicted of a crime to lose homes, cars, cash or other property.

Americans are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, but civil forfeiture turns that principle on its head. With civil forfeiture, your property is guilty until you prove it innocent.

Policing for Profit: The Abuse of Civil Asset Forfeiture chronicles how state and federal laws leave innocent property owners vulnerable to forfeiture abuse and encourage law enforcement to take property to boost their budgets. The report finds that by giving law enforcement a direct financial stake in forfeiture efforts, most state and federal laws encourage policing for profit, not justice.

Policing for Profit also grades the states on how well they protect property owners—only three states receive a B or better. And in most states, public accountability is limited as there is little oversight or reporting about how police and prosecutors use civil forfeiture or spend the proceeds.

Federal laws encourage even more civil forfeiture abuse through a loophole called “equitable sharing” that allows law enforcement to circumvent even the limited protections of state laws. With equitable sharing, law enforcement agencies can and do profit from forfeitures they wouldn’t be able to under state law.

It’s time to end civil forfeiture. People shouldn’t lose their property without being convicted of a crime, and law enforcement shouldn’t be able to profit from other people’s property.

Press Release

Check out this report's press release and contact our media team member for additional information.

John E. Kramer
Vice President for Communications
jkramer@ij.org

Press Release

“Policing for Profit” Report Documents the Nationwide Abuse of Civil Forfeiture

  • John Kramer
  • March 30, 2010

  Arlington, Va.—It’s called policing for profit and it’s happening all across America. Police and prosecutors’ offices seize private property—often without ever charging the owners […]

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